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Ambulance Crash in New Jersey

 

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Five Injured Including Patient

A LIFESTAR RESPONSE AMBULANCE in Washington Twp., New Jersey, that was carrying a patient was involved in a collision Friday afternoon.  The crash occurred around 1:15 on Rte. 57 when a minivan pulled out of a side road into the path of the ambulance causing a severe collision.

njamb a expresstimesExpress-Times

The Warren Reporter tells:

The unidentified patient (in the ambulance) was previously injured, and sustained new injuries in the crash, possibly aggravating their condition, police said. Five people were trapped in vehicles and were hurt, officials said. Police could not discuss the extent of the injuries, but at least two people (were transported to the hospital).

njamb b exptimesExpress-Times

Police said a preliminary investigation of the accident revealed that the minivan was traveling on Washburn Avenue when it entered the intersection and crashed into the ambulance, which was heading east on Route 57.

There are no charges at this time, and the investigation is still ongoing.

njamb c exptimesExpress-Times

Five people were transported to the hospital but it appeared that none of the injuries were life-threatening.

The Express-Times has more plus a large photo gallery HERE.

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Comments - Add Yours

  • mr618

    “The unidentified patient (in the ambulance) was previously injured, and sustained new injuries in the crash, possibly aggravating their condition….”?

    NO, NO, NO!! The “unidentified patient” is singular, “their” is plural. Using “their” as a singular pronoun is just plain wrong. Yes, the English language needs a non-gender-specific singular pronoun (other than the obnoxious “s/he”), but “their” is not it.

    That ranks right up there with saying “Myself and Battalion Seven are on the scene.” Nope, “myself” is not on the scene, I am. “Battalion Seven and I are on the scene.” “Myself” is not going to the store, I am. It doesn’t make you sound professional, it makes you sound pompous and ignorant.

    And obviously, this is NOT aimed at the responders, but at the reporters, who ought to know better.